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Reflux & Indigestion

View our range of acid reflux & indigestion treatments.

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Acid reflux

Acid reflux is a fairly common condition affecting 25% of the UK population at some point. It is more common in young adults and affects men and women equally. One of the main causes is excessive acid and weakness of the gastro-esophageal sphincter allowing acid in the stomach to leak back into the esophagus. Acid reflux may also be referred to as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or indigestion.

 

 

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Dec 21, 2017 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Apr 22, 2021 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

The acid reflux symptoms include the following. If you are experiencing any severe forms of these symptoms we recommend you talk to your doctor:

  • Heartburn symptoms: burning sensation behind the breastbone
  • Regurgitation of food in the mouth
  • Acid taste in the mouth
  • Upset stomach and stomach pain
  • Indigestion symptoms: abdominal pain, fullness, nausea, bloating, flatulence and belching
  • Trouble breathing

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Dec 21, 2017 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Apr 01, 2021 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Acid reflux is caused by a combination of too much stomach acid and a weak esophageal sphincter (the ring of muscles at the bottom of your esophagus). When the sphincter isn’t doing its job properly, it allows acid to flow up into your esophagus causing an irritation that feels like a burning sensation. 

There are lots of reasons why you might suffer from too much acid, including lifestyle factors like how much you smoke and drink, and the things you eat. Acid reflux can also be caused by an underlying health condition, like a stomach ulcer or stress and anxiety. 

You can read more on this in our blog post: ‘What are the symptoms of heartburn?

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Dec 21, 2017 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Acid reflux can be managed through lifestyle changes, medications and in more severe cases surgery for long term suffers.

Lifestyle Advice

  • Avoid alcohol
  • Avoid aggravating foods such as peppermint, tomato, chocolate, spices, hot drinks, coffee
  • Eat slowly and eat smaller meals and avoid lying down after meals
  • Avoid eating before bedtime
  • Reduce stress levels and anxiety
  • Weight loss
  • Stop smoking
  • Raising of the head of the bed
  • Better posture

Medications

Acid reflux tablets and capsules medication options include:

  • Over the counter Antacids e.g. Rennie: is an anti acidity capsule which works by counteracting the acidity in the stomach
  • Alginate-containing antacids e.g. Gaviscon: which is an effective medicine to treat stomach acid, forming a ‘raft’ that floats on the surface of the stomach to reduce the amount of acid and reflux and protect the esophagus
  • Histamine H2 receptor antagonists e.g. Zantac (Ranitidine) stomach acid tablets: which reduce stomach acidity by stopping the action of histamine on cells which usually signal the release of stomach acid
  • Proton-pump inhibitors e.g. Omeprazole, Lansoprazole, Pantoprazole: these heartburn tablets provide the most effective relief by inhibiting the enzyme of the cells in the stomach which usually releases stomach acid

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Dec 21, 2017 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Apr 01, 2021 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

People with acid reflux often describe having a burning sensation in their throat or chest. Other symptoms can include: 

  • A sour taste in your mouth 
  • Bad breath 
  • A hoarse voice 
  • A cough or hiccups 
  • Bloating and feeling sick 

 Severe acid reflux can be caused by an underlying medical condition; if you’ve suffered with these symptoms for three weeks or more, you should see your GP.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Certain foods are thought to help control the symptoms of acid reflux. These include: 

  • Leafy green vegetables, cucumber, asparagus, and broccoli 
  • Non-acidic fruits, such as bananas, apples, pears, and melons 
  • Lean meats and seafood  
  • Whole-grain cereals, bread, and rice 

You should also swap fizzy drinks and acidic fruit juice for water. Avoid processed, fatty foods, including dairy, which can put extra pressure on your gut. 

Read more in our blog ‘Acid reflux and what foods to avoid’.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Acid reflux can irritate the lining of your esophagus and leave you with a burning sensation in your throat. To relieve these symptoms, there are two types of medication:

  • Antacids, such as Rennie, that neutralise stomach acid.
  • Proton pump inhibitors to stop the stomach producing acid.

Most people will experience the symptoms of acid reflux at some point in their life; it’s usually caused by eating too much or the wrong type of food. However, if you’ve had symptoms for three weeks or more, you could be suffering from an underlying medical condition, and we recommend seeing your GP so they can investigate the cause.

They may suggest making some long-term lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, cutting down on your alcohol intake, or changing your diet. All of these things can help get rid of acid reflux in the throat and alleviate the symptoms of heartburn.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Acid reflux can cause coughing – it’s caused by the irritation to the lining of your esophagus (the tube which connects your throat and stomach). You might also experience hiccups, a sour taste in your mouth, bad breath, and a hoarse voice.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Tackling the cause of your acid reflux in the day will improve your symptoms at night, but there are things you can do specifically before going to bed.

  • Stop eating at least three to four hours before bed to give your food time to make its way through your digestive system before you lay down.
  • Raise the end of your bed by 10 to 20cms so your head and chest are higher than your waist – this stops stomach acid travelling up your throat.

You should also avoid drinking fizzy drinks and alcohol before bed, where you can.

If the symptoms of acid reflux are stopping you from getting a good night’s sleep, speak to our team of trained healthcare providers for help finding a suitable treatment.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Some foods that are more likely to cause acid reflux than others, such as coffee, chocolate, and fizzy drinks. We also recommend avoiding the following:

  • Fatty foods such as greasy chips, crisps, creamy sauces, butter and whole milk
  • Acidic fruit and vegetables, including tomatoes, onion, pineapple, and citrus fruits

There is some debate over whether spicy foods cause acid reflux. To find your individual food “triggers”, keep a food diary so you can pinpoint what’s causing the problem.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Stress and anxiety can both cause acid reflux, and you may also find that struggling with the symptoms of long-term reflux can lead to you feeling stressed.

If you think this may be the case, speak to your doctor for help managing your mental health. They may suggest counselling or CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy).

Treatments like Omeprazole or Pantoprazole can be used to alleviate your symptoms while you tackle the underlying cause

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) can be prescribed by GPs and some pharmacists to treat acid reflux and heartburn. At Post My Meds, we sell three different PPIs: 

They all work in the same way by inhibiting a key enzyme involved in the production of stomach acid. Though all three are equally good, you may find that one suits you better than the others, and you can explore this with your GP or pharmacist.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Caffeine can trigger the symptoms of acid reflux, so herbal teas are often recommended as an alternative. If mint aggravates your symptoms, avoid this type of tea and try liquorice instead. Liquorice can help coat the esophagus with extra mucus.

Some herbs can interfere with medications, so check with your GP or pharmacist if you’re worried about a potential conflict.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Coffee is a known cause of acid reflux, so we recommend avoiding this type of high-caffeine drink if you want to alleviate your symptoms. You should also avoid fizzy drinks, alcohol, and highly acidic fruit juices – try switching to water where you can.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Acid reflux happens when the contents of your stomach travels back up into your throat, causing a burning sensation. It happens when the ring of muscles at the bottom of your esophagus (the esophageal sphincter) is left open. This irritates the lining of the esophagus, which causes symptoms often referred to collectively as heartburn.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Most people will suffer from acid reflux at some point in their life; it’s usually the result of eating too much or eating the wrong type of foods. If you suffer from acid reflux persistently, you should see your GP to determine what’s causing it. They may suggest making some long-term changes to your lifestyle, such as adapting your diet.

There are two main types of medication that can help relieve the symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux.

  • Antacids, such as Rennie, to neutralise stomach acid
  • Proton pump inhibitors that stop the production of stomach acid.

Speak to the team at Post My Meds for advice on choosing the right treatment.

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm

Some people find that drinking milk alleviates the burning sensation associated with acid reflux. However, some kinds of milk can make your symptoms worse – whole milk, for example, contains a lot of fat, which is a known reflux-trigger. You may find that a low-fat version or an alternative type of milk, such as almond milk, is better. 

Although all of our content is written and reviewed by healthcare professionals, it should not be substituted for or used as medical advice. If you have any questions about your health, please speak to your doctor.

Authored Jan 06, 2022 by Joseph Issac, MPharm
Reviewed Jan 06, 2022 by Prabjeet Saundh, MPharm